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Viva Lewes
 

Issue 9 of Viva Lewes goes to press on Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent, when much of the rest of Europe is recovering from a massive hangover and clearing confetti and other party detritus from the streets. In Italy, Spain, Germany, Holland, Poland, Belgium, Portugal, Croatia and Austria Carnival (probably from the Latin ‘carnem levare’ - stop eating meat) is a massive celebration with floats and fancy dress, music and drinking, masks and fireworks. It’s great for kids, it’s great for adults, everyone lets loose: there’s plenty of community spirit. And what do we do in England? We toss a few pancakes around in our kitchen, if we can be bothered. Pancake Day, frankly, is as flat… as a pancake. Over here we have generally lost the habit of community partying: we don’t look forward to major events where we can communally let our hair down: perhaps this is one of the reasons why so many people binge drink on such a regular basis. Of course Lewes is different, of course we have Bonfire Night, a well-prepared, well-executed town festival which sets the tone for the rest of the year. Lewesians are pro-active, hence all the events arranged in the town. This week is no exception. There’s cinema, music, football, art and comedy. Best of all, there’s the annual Lewes Arms Panto, a dash of Bonfire spirit in theatrical form. We say: go out and enjoy these events. We say: get involved. We say: party on. Enjoy the week.

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Viva Lewes

Above: Path by Mary Anne Aytoun Ellis (we reckon it’s Juggs Way). Cover: Downs by Phil Tyler courtesy of the Art Room at the Needlemakers
 
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Viva Lewes
March 2nd - 8th 2006
 

  • Art: Icelandic Art talk (13); Sarah Grisewood (15); Nick Bodimeade (22)
  • Blues: Little George Sueref (11)
  • Bricks and Mortar (23)
  • Cinema: Battle of Algiers (7)
  • Classical Music: Kungsbacka Trio (6); East Sussex Bach Choir (14); Roedean Singers (19)
  • Comedy: Barnstormers (4)
  • Dance: Henry Oguike (20)
  • Folk: Simon Ritchie (5)
  • Food: Farmers’ Market (9)
  • Football: Lewes v Thurrock (10) Lewes v Sutton (21)
  • Gig: LedZepToo (12)
  • Hillbilly Blues: Curst Sons (16)
  • Legal: Crown Court (24)
  • Kids: Nick Sharratt book signing (8); Middle Farm (17)
  • Panto: Lewes Arms Panto (18)
  • Photography: Photo of the Week (25)
  • Travel: Arundel (25)

Contact Viva Lewes
Editorial (alex@vivalewes.com)
Marketing (nick@vivalewes.com)
Design & Technical (dave@vivalewes.com)


Cinema - Godzilla

Star Jump: Henry Oguike Dance Company at the Gardner Arts Centre (page 20)

 
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Viva Kids
 
Thursday 2nd March
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Comedy - Barnstormers

When Nick Doody was at college he was commissioned by the student rag to do an interview with the great radical American comedian Bill Hicks, nicknamed ‘Noam Chomsky with dick jokes’. When he mentioned that he was interested in becoming a comedian, Hicks invited him to be the supporting act, in front of several hundred people, at his next gig. Needless to say he did it, needless to say he died. “The only lines which got a positive reaction were ‘Ladies and gentleman – Bill Hicks!’” remembers Doody, who went on to become the now-late Hicks’ biographer. Fourteen years on Doody has become one of Britain’s top stand-up comedians, known for his sick, satirical sense of humour, and often likened to Hicks and his rival Denis Leary.

Doody is one of three comedians headlining tonight at the monthly Barnstormers Comedy Night at Pelham House. One of the other two is yet to be announced (Barnstormers always hope for a last-minute star name), the other is Andrew Clover, a very physical comedian of whose Fringe performance the Scotsman raved ‘the best fun I’ve had in Edinburgh with my clothes on’. Clover has had his own Radio 4 series, Storyman. Choose your seat carefully: he’s fond of audience participation numbers.

 
Where?
Pelham House
When? 8pm
How Much? £9 (£7.50 advance from Garden Room Café, Station St, Lewes or on 01323 490001, £5 NUS cards)
 
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Viva Kids
 
Thursday 2nd March
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Folk - Simon Ritchie

“One day I saw someone playing a squeezebox, and I thought ‘I’ve just got to have one of those’” says Simon Ritchie, who is appearing at the Royal Oak tonight. He taught himself the art listening to traditional players who once frequented the country pubs in Suffolk and rural Essex, where he lives. He’s been playing ever since, and has established himself as one of the country’s foremost melodeon players, both in his own right and with The Posh Band, much loved by DJ’s such as the late John Peel, Andy Kershaw and Phil Jupitus.

His set is comprised of “traditional songs famous in East Anglia for the last 100 or 200 years, learnt from performers who are still remembered if not still alive”. He often accompanies step-dancing (and occasionally plays and steps at the same time ‘if only for 45 seconds’). But his set is varied and changes according to his and the audience’s mood. “I’ve been known to cover The Kaiser Chiefs,” he says: on his latest album ‘Squeezebox Schizophrenia’ he performs melodeon covers of the likes of Johnny Rotten (‘Anarchy in the UK’), Smokey Robinson (‘Tracks of my Tears’) and Boney M (‘Rivers of Babylon’). John Kirkpatrick says of the LP ‘the perfect English World Music Record: bonkers.’

 
Where?
The Royal Oak, Station St, Lewes
When? 8.30pm
How Much? £4.50
Folk - Peta Webb, Ken Hall and Simon Hindley
Folk at the Oak
(w) www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~tinvic
(t) 01273 478124
 
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Viva Kids
 
Friday 3rd March
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Classical Concert – The Kungsbacka Trio

Last week blues guitarist Kent Duchaine appeared at the Lansdown Arms playing Leadbessie, his 72-year-old National Steel guitar. Tonight Jesper Svedberg, of the Kungsbacka Piano Trio, arrives in town with a rather older instrument – a Grancino cello from 1699. Jesper is joined by the other two parts of this fine ensemble, fellow Swede Malin Broman, who plays a 1748 Gagliano violin, and Englishman Simon Crawford-Phillips, on whatever piano he finds at the venue. These are three extremely accomplished musicians indeed whose other commitments in the 2005/6 season include performances at the Wigmore Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall and the Purcell Room. They have recently played in many of the world’s major concert venues, including New York’s Carnegie Hall. And tonight… the Sussex Downs College. One should never underestimate the hard work of the Nicholas Yonge Society in bringing quality classical music to this town.

Tonight the ensemble are playing piano trios from Beethoven and Fauré and Rachmaninov’s ‘A la Mémoire d’un Grand Artiste’. Expect to be wowed. “It is an exhilarating experience when an audience knows it has just been enthralled by a performance from young musicians early in their career who are inevitably destined for greatness on the world stage,” rave The Inverness Courier, who know a good Piano Trio when they see one.

 
Where?
Cliffe Building, Sussex Downs College
When? 8.10pm
How Much? £12/£10
Theatre - Great Expectations
Kungsbacka Trio:
(w) click here
Nicholas Yonge Society:
(t) 01273 476555
(w) www.nyslewes.org.uk
 
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Viva Kids
 
Friday 3rd March
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Cinema - The Battle of Algiers

The most time-relevant political movie you’ll see all year was made in 1965. The Battle of Algiers, commissioned by the Algerian government, directed by Gillo Pontecorvo, is a masterpiece about Muslim insurgency in Algeria in the last decade of the French occupation of the country. Hiring only one professional actor, Jean Martin, who plays the French military commander, Pontecorvo paints an incredibly vivid picture of the bombings and retributions which afflicted the country in the run up to independence in 1962. Some of the scenes are so well choreographed you can’t believe that the Italian director didn’t use documentary footage.

Former rebel leader Saadi Yacef excels in a role similar to that which he played in the real revolution; Brahim Haggiag, playing a prisoner politicised by witnessing police brutality in jail, is excellent in the central role. The movie’s timeliness was not lost on the Pentagon, which showed the film to military staff in 2003 as a field guide for countering terrorism in Iraq.

 
Where?
All Saints Centre, Friars Walk, Lewes
When? 8pm
How Much? £4.50
Dewponds
Lewes Film Club:
(t) 01903 523833
(w) www.lewescinema.co.uk
Official Trailer
(w) click here
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
1 of 9
 

World Book Day Event - Nick Sharratt

World Book Day (WBD) is celebrated on April 23rd in most of the world, apart from here, where in our own quirky British way, we celebrate it on March 2nd. The origins of the event, designated by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading, go back to a Catalan tradition of giving books and roses to loved ones on St George’s Day – maybe as this years event falls so close to St David’s Day we could give daffodils instead? Our local schools get involved, handing out £1 tokens exchangeable for one of six special WBD books, ranging from the pre-school ‘Here Comes Harry with his Bucketful of Dinosaurs’, through to ‘Koyasan’, a horror story targeting an older 11+ audience. Most Lewes booksellers also accept them as a discount off any other book of your choice.

To celebrate this years’ event, Bags of Books, South Street’s wonderful children’s bookshop, are bringing acclaimed author and official WBD illustrator Nick Sharratt to town. As well as signing copies of his own work, Nick will be taking part in a Q&A session and demonstrating his award-winning illustrative skills, as featured in well over 100 books. Last years event was apparently great fun, so we advise you to get there early.

 
Where?
St Thomas’ Church Hall, Cliffe High St, Lewes
When? 10.30am
How Much? Free (recommended for children 4 and over, and all children must be accompanied)
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
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Farmers Market - Cliffe Precinct

At some point over the last twenty years, supermarketeers decided that we couldn’t live without pre-packed stunted non-seasonal vegetables flown from around the world. They offered us cheaper lamb if we accepted stock from New Zealand and persuaded us we’d be better off buying bacon from Denmark. Any doubts could be washed down with a remarkably cheap bottle of Chilean Chardonnay, as we tucked in to a bowl of exotic – and probably ‘baby’ – fruit. ‘Now you get more choice,’ they boasted.

In truth, we get less choice, as butchers, bakers and fruit and veg shops around the country close down, unable to compete with the all- consuming greed of the global corporations. A tipping point has been reached: all is lost. Or is it? At the monthly farmers’ market you can buy locally grown, often organic and usually un-stunted produce from the people that grew it. The more you buy, the more they sell, the more the balance is redressed. And, in this era of food scares and genetically modified products, isn’t it comforting to be able to talk to the people who actually produced the stuff? This way, you get some decent, local, seasonal food and they get a bit more cash by not having to sell at below cost price to the supermarkets.

 
Where?
Cliffe Precinct
When? 9am – 1pm
How Much? As much as you can carry…
Theatre - The Winslow Boy
Lewes Farmers Market:
(t) 01273 470900
(w) www.commoncause.org.uk/farmersmarket/
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
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Lewes v Thurrock

Thurrock come into this game on the back of eight straight defeats, so anything short of a victory for the Rooks will be a major set-back to their play-off hopes. ‘Fleet’ (until a few years ago known as ‘Purfleet FC’) have only scored three goals in those games – all from striker Kris Lee – and have plummeted down the table out of play-off contention. The Rooks’ play-off hopes are still looking healthy after a 3-2 away win at Newport County last weekend. Lewes have recently acquired the knack of nicking results in tight contests despite not playing particularly well, and the game against Newport was no exception. Lewes played the first half with a gale force wind behind them, and were 2-0 up at half time, then 3-1 up on 89 minutes, but a second Welsh goal meant for a nervous five minutes of injury time, with County twice inches from an equaliser.

So Lewes stay fifth, one of six clubs realistically chasing four play-off places, with 12 games to go. Failing to get maximum points this afternoon would be disastrous: but Rooks being Rooks don’t expect the win to look easy. Viva prediction: 3-2


 

 
Where?
The Dripping Pan, Mountfield Rd, Lewes
When? 3pm
How Much? £9 adults, £6 14-16 years old, £2 kids
Gig - Turning Green
Lewes FC
(w) www.lewesfc.com
 
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
4 of 9
 

Blues - Little George Sueref

Now Dig This Magazine have said that he has ‘the best voice in Europe’ and while that might be pushing matters a bit far it’s certain that Little George Sueref is one of the best bluesmen around in the UK, a guitar and harmonica player as well as a fine singer, who has shared the stage with some of the legends of the USA including Lazy Lester, Big Jack Johnson and Homesick James, picking something up from every one of them. His music – mostly self-penned – is deeply rooted in the downhome blues style of the 50’s and 60’s: his voice is soulful in the style of Johnnie Taylor and Clay Hammond. Throughout the nineties he played harp and sang in Big Joe Louis and His Blues Kings, winning Blueprint’s ‘Harp Player of the Year’ award three times. Then he started up his own band, and in 2000 he went his own way, subsequently releasing the LP ‘Little George Sueref and the Blues Stars, which was in Mojo’s top five records in their 2001 year review.

London-based Little G, of Greek descent, has immense stage presence and is as unique a blues act as you’re likely to see, ‘one of that select few who are able to take their chosen influences and craft them into their own, strongly identifiable sound,’ according to fRoots Magazine.

 
Where?
Lansdown, Station St, Lewes
When? 8.30pm
How Much? Free
Cinema - March of the Penguins
Lansdown Arms:
(t) 01273 480623
(w) www.thelansdownarms.com
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
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LedZepToo

In 2002 Robert Plant went to see Led Zeppelin tribute band Letz Zep at the Dublin Castle in Camden Town, thinking he could sneak in incognito to check out what his ‘double’ looked like. Of course he was spotted: the place was jammed with Zep-heads. Imagine the mayhem. Sadly he didn’t get on stage and sing a number – he fled into the night, embarrassed to hell.

There’s something of a Led Zeppelin tribute band plague at the moment, with at least four bands gigging round the UK, one of whom, LedZepToo, are playing a the All Saints tonight. “We don’t try to be a lookalike band, we try to be a soundalike band,” says band leader Mike who, playing guitar, ‘is’ Jimmy Page. The band have been doing their Led Zep act for a year now. “We do the old favourites like Stairway to Heaven, Kashmere, Whole Lotta Love and Dazed and Confused, but we also try to do some more obscure tracks, too.” He doesn’t mind the fact that the band’s repertoire is limited and finite. “Led Zep used to jam live, so there’s plenty of room for interpretation.” If you go, look carefully at the long-haired guy standing next to you, mouthing all the words and playing air guitar. You never know who it could be.

 
Where?
All Saints Centre, Friars Walk, Lewes
When? 7.45pm for 8.30pm
How Much? £6/£4
Cinema - March of the Penguins
LedZepToo
(w) www.ledzeptoo.co.uk
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
6 of 9
 

Art - Star Gazing: Paintings from Iceland and the Imagination, a talk by Mary Anne Aytoun Ellis

People confess to Mary Anne Aytoun Ellis that they are scared of mountains. Looking at her work, you can see why. The artist has spent the last three years painting landscapes that go beyond brooding to menacing and spiritual. Dark things far away, covered in ice, are closing in, or you are just about to fall. The paintings she did in Scotland are full of red. The ones she did in Iceland are blackish blue, and the light is windstorm or moonlight. A delicate question: how does she avoid kitsch? Her subject matter is dangerous territory for a serious artist. How does Ellis paint moonlit caribou beside mountains that do not end up like something air brushed on the side of a motorcycle?

"I hate that kind of thing," says Ellis. "Cliché, camp - I have to be absolutely rigorous with myself and honestly paint what I think and see." So far she has succeeded. Her paintings are being shown at the Portland Gallery in London and this weekend she is giving a talk at the Paddock Art Studios. Ellis grew up in Lewes, and says her favourite, most dramatic landscape is still the South Downs. "There is so much pressure to build on them" she says "It makes them even more precious."

 
Where?
Paddock Art Studios, Paddock Lane, Lewes
When? 2:30pm
How Much? £3.00, members free
Talk - Archaeology on the South Downs
Paddock Art Studios:
(w) www.paddockartstudios.co.uk
(t) 01273 483000
 
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
7 of 9
 

Classical Music - The East Sussex Bach Choir

2006 is the 250th anniversary of the birth of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. To celebrate this the East Sussex Bach Choir are performing a concert at the Town Hall comprised of four works by WA, and one by Leopold Mozart, his father, whose trumpet concerto is one of a smattering of fine works that survive. Mozart senior sacrificed his talent in order to nurture that of his prodigy son, the enfant terrible of classical music and very possibly the most talented composer yet to have emerged. The choir start off with an early Mozart symphony (No 22) followed by his 'Laudate Dominum' and 'In Diesen Heilgen Hallen'. Leopold's trumpet concerto completes the first half of the concert. The second half is taken up entirely with Mozart's magnificent C Minor Mass.

2006 also sees the 20th anniversary of the ESBC, which specialises in works from the Baroque and early classical periods but prides itself on its versatility. Tonight they are joined by the Sussex Classical Players led by Julia Bishop from the ensemble 'Red Priest'. The soloists are singers Sarah Jane Davies, Elizabeth Watts, Mark Curtis, and Michael George and trumpeter Neil Brough. The Musical Director is John Hancorn.

 
Where?
Lewes Town Hall
When? 7.30pm
How Much? £17.50/£15
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
8 of 9
 

Art - Sara Grisewood

The 100-year-old Wenban Smith timber yard between Waitrose and the river might not seem the most aesthetically pleasing of buildings but for artist Sara Grisewood it represented one of the last tangible links with Lewes’ industrial riverside past. “I saw a letter in the Sussex Express just over a year ago complaining of ‘this hideous building’ and decided to do a project on it,” says Sara. She spent several months sketching and taking photos there last spring and summer. “I became the artist in residence. The light in the building is very particular as it shines through from either side as it would through a barn”. In her studio she turned those preparations into acrylic paintings, which are on exhibition at the Thebes Gallery for the next two weeks. The results, post-impressionistic in style, are very striking, and rather beautiful.

On Saturday 11th March Sara is running a workshop at the Thebes Gallery teaching participants to convert sketches and photos into acrylic and mixed media paintings. The day costs £20 including materials. Tickets from the Thebes Gallery or from Hannah on 01273 484400.

 
Where?
Thebes Gallery, Church Twitten, Lewes
When? 10.30-5pm Tues-Sat (closed 1.45-2.30pm) 12 noon-5pm Sunday. Runs till 19th March.
How Much? Free
Blues - John Crampton
Thebes Gallery
(t) 01273 484214 or 01273 484400
 
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Viva Kids
 
Saturday 4th March
9 of 9
 

Hillbilly Blues - The Curst Sons

In the sleeve notes of their latest album ‘Hell Awaits You’ hillbilly blues band the Curst Sons write little round-ups giving a précis of their song narratives. For ‘Graveyard Dirt’ read “Southern woman uses underhand methods to attract lover”; ‘On the Road Again’ has “Husband complains about poor domestic catering and infidelity”; and ‘Hobo’ boils down to “Gentleman-of-the-road informs young woman he is poor husband material.” You can get the gist of the band’s where-with-all from these little nuggets: Brighton based, their heartbeats are powered from somewhere between the Louisiana swamps and the Appalachian mountains. They sing of up-to-no-good check-shirt-wearing white trash in the Depression era Southern States of America.

Of course there’s a banjo, of course there’s slide guitar, of course there’s a washboard, rhythm pole and slide mandolin. And, of course, there’s a whole load of infectious energy from this exuberant threesome, who wowed the same venue six weeks ago. What you don’t expect is that once the band get into their foot-stomping swing, a dark spirit occasionally takes over, and hollers menacingly amid the whoops.

 
Where?
The Snowdrop
When? 8.30pm
How Much? Free
Tribute - In Bob We Trust
The Snowdrop
(t) 01273 471018
The Curst Sons
(w) www.thecurstsons.co.uk
 
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Viva Kids
 
Sunday 5th March
1 of 1
 

Take a trip to… Middle Farm

The Viva Lewes team unashamedly favour our produce locally produced, so we are therefore very sympathetic to the ideology behind Middle Farm. It works like this: you are invited into the heart of this 625-acre working Sussex farm and allowed to see its managers in action, surrounded by their menagerie, which includes ducks, spotted pigs, donkeys, rabbits, guinea pigs and perhaps more surprisingly a fair few cats. There are also a variety of locally bred chickens as well as a herd of prize-winning pedigree Jersey cows, which get milked every afternoon. The farm also has outdoor and indoor play areas and a nature trail around the farm to burn up any excess energy on display.

Additional attractions include a shop selling traditional children’s toys and an excellent farm shop and restaurant where you can taste a selection of their home cooked wares. Even better, perhaps, is the fact that Middle Farm is also home to the marvellously named National Collection of Cider & Perry, where over 100 different draught ciders are on display – you can try before you buy – and importantly, there is also fresh apple juice for the kids and the designated driver…

 
Where?
Firle (on A27 4 miles east of Lewes)
When? Daily 10am - 5pm
How Much?

Open Farm £2.50 each; £11 Family ticket for 5; under 3’s free

Literary Club - Neil Bartlett
Middle Farm
(w) www.middlefarm.com
(t) 01323 811411
 
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Viva Kids
 
Monday 6th March
1 of 1
 

Sleeping Beauty - Lewes Arms Dramatic Society

It’s panto, but not as we know it. For 28 years the Lewes Arms have put out an annual adult pantomime, full of bawdy jokes and local references. This year it’s Sleeping Beauty. I interview a handful of cast members in the regulars’ sitting room, otherwise known as the front bar.
“Is it smutty?”
“No it’s not smutty. It’s full of innuendo, though.”
“What sort?”
“Sexual innuendo.”
“So where does it differ from regular Sleeping Beauties?”
“The title’s the same but any other similarity is purely coincidental. There isn’t normally a hippo. Or a frog. Or two rabbits.”
The acting, they admit, isn’t up to much, but that’s all part of the fun.
“The prompter is the busiest man in the show”.
I’m urged to point out that the costumes are designed by Sublime to the Ridiculous in Barcombe (though the hippo suit was made by cast members) and all proceeds go to three charities: this year the Pells, the Nutty Wizard and the St Peter and St James Hospice. There’s also a £100 plus prize raffle. It may not be slick and it certainly won’t be professional. But the real deal with the Lewes Arms panto is that the cast are clearly having such a scream that you can’t help but enjoy it.

 
Where?
The Lewes Arms
When? Monday-Saturday. Tickets still available Monday and Tuesday.
How Much? £5 plus post-panto donations in the bucket. Tickets from the Lewes Arms tel 01273 471018.
Literary Club - Neil Bartlett
Mooseworld
(w) www.mooseworld.com
 
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Viva Kids
 
Tuesday 7th March
1 of 2
 

Hungarian Folk Songs and other music – The Roedean Singers/Orchestra

Hungarian academic Matyas Seiber was one of the most eclectic and adventurous composers of the twentieth century, but his first love was for simple local songs. Seiber was an accomplice of Bartok and Kodaly, who dedicated enormous time and energy to collecting up and annotating Hungarian folk songs. In 1927, shortly before moving to Germany to teach jazz at Frankfurt University, he wrote Three Hungarian Folk Songs for Unaccompanied Choir. It is a beautiful and now-rarely-heard piece, and a bold choice for the Roedean Girls Choir to perform, alongside a section of their orchestra, at the Westgate Chapel tonight. The 40-strong group (who will almost fill the tiny chapel on their own!) are also performing Four Songs by Brahms, another bold and original choice featuring two harps and a horn; Schumann’s piano quintet; Weber’s concertino for solo clarinet; and a rendition of Vivaldi’s Winter.

Seiber was forced to leave Germany because of his religion (he was Jewish) and because of his love for ‘degenerate’ jazz. He moved to England and became a hugely influential teacher to many musicians who still perform on these shores.

 
Where?
Westgate Chapel
When? 7.30
How much? £7
Art - The Art Room
 
 
 
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Viva Kids
 
Tuesday 7th March
2 of 2
 

Dance - Henri Oguike Dance Company

Welsh-Nigerian dancer Henri Oguike snapped an achilles tendon in 1999 and moved into choreography. He has become the UK dance world’s hottest property, an eclectic adventurer who manages to marry artistry and art in his entertaining pieces – he is routinely compared with Mark Morris and Richard Alston, which is high praise. Tonight at the Gardner, Oguike’s dance company present four different performances: Front Line, an established sextet danced to Shostakovich’s 9th quartet in e-flat; Expression Lines, a solo performance by Oguike himself; Tiger Dancing, inspired by William Blake’s poetry; and How I Look, a newly arranged finale featuring the whole company.

The Telegraph raves about Oguike’s ‘musical instincts, physical inventiveness, intellectual scale, emotional daring and capacity to entertain.’ The Evening Standard calls him ‘the innovator modern dance needs.’ Oguike is always eager to move on to fresh pastures. “I feel as though I’ve chewed all the grass around me,” he told the Guardian a couple of weeks ago. “I want to move on.” Expect to be surprised; expect to be thrilled; expect to be moved.

 
Where?
Gardner Arts Centre, University of Sussex
When? 8pm - Pre-show discussion 6.30pm
How Much? £12.50/£10/£7
History & Heritage - Newhaven Fort
Gardner Arts Centre
(t) 01273 685861
(w) click here
Henri Oguike Dance Company
(w) click here
 
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Viva Kids
 
Wednesday 8th March
1 of 1
 

Lewes v Sutton United

On November 8th Lewes went to Sutton United as league leaders and confirmed their top-dog status with a fantastic performance which saw them breach the U’s defence five times in a 5-1 win. Four of those goals came from a red-hot Jean-Michel Sigere, who was substituted on the hour shortly having scored his fourth with an impudent back heel. Sutton had made a good start to the season (they won their first five on the trot) but never recovered from their mauling, and have only managed two wins since, leading to long-term manager John Rains’ resignation last month. Sadly Lewes were unable to capitalise on the result, and have rarely looked anywhere near as convincing since.

So Sutton, who are the last non-league side to beat top flight opposition in the FA Cup (a 2-0 win over Coventry in 1991) will be looking for revenge at the Pan today, while Lewes will be desperate to put in a convincing performance to galvanise their play-off run-in, which includes games against promotion-chasing rivals Cambridge City, Welling, Havant and Weymouth. Viva Prediction: 2-1

 
Where?
The Dripping Pan, Mountfield Rd, Lewes
When? 7.45pm
How Much? £9 adults, £6 14-16 years old, £2 kids
Bricks and Mortar - Baldy’s Garden
Lewes FC:
(w) www.lewesfc.com
 
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Viva Kids
 
Extras
1 of 4
 

Bricks and Mortar - Castle Place

Just south of the castle a classical Georgian building stands out among the higgledy-piggledy medieval facades of the High Street like a polished crown in a set of otherwise unkempt teeth. This is Castle Place, a perfectly symmetrical building which was designed by local architect Amon Wilds in 1811 on a site where the White Horse Inn had previously stood.

Look up the vast seemingly Corinthian columns which flank the stucco facade and you’ll see that the capitals are in fact shaped like ammonites. In 1818 noted geologist Dr. Gideon Mantell bought the house and redesigned the facade a year later to represent his hobby (by trade he was a doctor). In 1822 Mantell discovered some huge fossil teeth in Cuckfield, which he eventually attributed to belong to a creature he named Iguanodon, which he called a ‘Fossil Reptile’, and surmised to be 60 feet in length. Detractors insisted the teeth belonged to a mammal, but Mantell was eventually proved to be correct. He had discovered the dinosaur, though that term was not coined until 1842. During WW2 Castle Place became the Sussex HQ for the Women’s Land Army; in 1985 it was bought by the Guild of Master Craftsmen, who currently run a publishing house on the premises.

 
Where?
166 The High Street, Lewes
 
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Viva Kids
 
Extras
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A Day out in… Arundel

The Zimmer Stewart Gallery in Arundel is putting on an exhibition by Lewes-based oil painter Nick Bodimeade, which provides an opportunity to visit the West Sussex town and check out a talented local artist at the same time. Bodimeade has made a name for choosing everyday themes – dogs, motorways, sheds and trucks – and transforming them into something else, bringing out their beauty by blurring their reality. In this collection of new work he concentrates on trees and beach paintings: in the latter series the abstract shapes and patterns of the people takes over from their personality.

Arundel, the UK’s pro-capita capital of cream teas, antique shops and second-hand books, is best visited in the winter to avoid the tourist hordes checking out the country’s second biggest (originally Norman) castle and the wonderful French-Gothic-style Victorian cathedral. This building (very) arguably makes Arundel England’s smallest city, with a resident population of just over 3,000. To complete the picture-postcard perfection the pretty River Arun flows alongside the town centre. Enjoy a pint of HSB in the Swan on the High Street before you leave.

 
Where?
Zimmer Stewart Gallery, 29 Tarrant St, Arundel
When? Nick Bodimeade 4th-24th March Open 10am-5.30pm (except Thurs) Sun 12noon-4pm
How Much? Free
Food - Seasons
Zimmer Stewart Gallery
(t) 01903 885867
(w) www.zimmerstewart.co.uk
 
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Viva Kids
 
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Lewes Crown Court

Of course it’s intimidating. Yes, you have to remove any metal items from your person and place them in the plastic tub. No, you are not allowed to take notes, photographs or audio recordings while you are here. It’s a first division Crown Court, apparently one of the three most important in the country. "We get everything here except terrorism charges," says Tyler Briggs of Securitas on the door. "We had the acid bath murderer and Roy Whiting who murdered Sarah Payne." When the cameras and fuzzy microphones are perched outside Forbuoys on the High Street it is probably too late to get a seat in the public gallery. But any day of the week, intimidating or not, the public are invited. Some people nip in when they have some time to kill. The trick of being a criminological voyeur is knowing what court to enter. Though the trial list is publicly available, it only refers to cases by the name of the defendant. But you can ask. And regulars go to the plea hearings on Fridays where the judge decides who will be up for what, when.

But it’s not television. "Sometimes," says Briggs "the jurors will come up on the same train as the accused and the witnesses. You can see them in court one minute and bump into them on line for a sandwich during lunch."

 
Where?
The High Street, Lewes
When? Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm
How Much? Depends on the judge
Food - Seasons
01273 480400
 
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Photo of the Week

This week’s photo of the week was sent in by John May, who took it on a simple APS camera outside the Lewes Arms. It is one of a series called ‘Lewes in Light’. You can find more of John’s eclectic writing and photography on his blog (http://hqinfo.blogspot.com) THE GENERALIST. We like its semi abstract feel, the mood of the sky, the differing depths of darkness in the shadows and the way in which the shadow of the street lamp is entirely framed by the gable of the building. Note to the new landlady of the Lewes Arms: aforementioned gable would make a fine outdoor cinema screen.

Feel free to send any photos, contributions, rants, advice, blank cheques or feedback to info@vivalewes.com.

In an earlier edition of Viva Lewes Issue 9 we erroneously listed three films, Wallace and Gromit, Sophie Scholl and A Cock and Bull Story to be appearing on Sunday 5th March. In fact they will be shown on the 12th and will appear in next week’s issue. We apologise if this caused any inconvenience.

Photo of the Week

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Viva Lewes
 

That’s another fine week we’ve gotten you into. We’d like to thank the following people, in no particular order, for helping us put this issue together: Simon Ritchie, Stephen Newberry, Rachel Waller, Shahnaz Awan, Willi Kerr, Hannah Weller, Nolberto Solano, Tom Snell, Mike from LedZepToo, Sara Grisewood, Tony Shepherd, James from Zimmer Stewart, Moose Jarvis… Contributors this week were: Dexter Lee, John May, Christian Thompson, Alex Leith, Antonia Gabassi, Nick Williams, David Burke and Dave Wilson.
Next week’s events include:
Sunday 12th: WW2 Propaganda posters at Newhaven Fort (right)
Monday 13th: Abstract painter Duncan Bullen at the Star Gallery
Tuesday 14th: O Go My Man, a highly-rated play by Stella Feehily at the Gardner Arts Centre
Wednesday 15th: Kendal Mountain Film Festival at the Town Hall
Plus a review of the new tapas restaurant, Guido’s, on the Bottleneck

Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our entries. Viva Lewes cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors or alterations. Please let us know if you want any event or opening to be considered for publication at info@vivalewes.com or on 01273 488882

To view back issues of Viva Lewes click here
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Food - Seasons
Naval Gazing: Propaganda posters helped keep up Home Front morale in WW2
 
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